Warriors call Utah boring, but fans say it’s place to party

first_imgView comments Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Bulacan town gears up for biggest cookie jar Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 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The reputation is based largely on the influence of the Mormon church, which teaches its members to abstain from drinking alcohol.Dennis Rodman complained about the nightlife during the 1998 NBA Finals when his Chicago Bulls played the Jazz. He hopped on a plane between games to gamble in Las Vegas.“My life just goes to complete hell when I go to Utah,” Rodman said at the time. “That means I have to revert to going back to Las Vegas or going somewhere to get some excitement, to keep my mind rolling.”ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikelycenter_img Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR MOST READ Scott Beck, president of Visit Salt Lake, sent a letter to the Warriors to accompany the video, saying the city can’t wait to host the 2015 NBA champions as they face the Utah Jazz in the Western Conference semifinals this weekend.“In case you do stumble across something to do while here in Salt Lake, all of our bartenders and servers are on notice to keep you up late!” Beck wrote.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnThe Jazz said Wednesday (Thursday Manila time) that they will sell navy blue T-shirts with “#Nightlife” written over a basketball logo in the team’s colors.The city’s campaign comes after some of the Warriors players talked about wishing they were playing the Clippers instead of the Jazz, mostly for the chance to have some time off in Los Angeles rather than Salt Lake City. Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home LIST: Jan. 20 class suspensions due to Taal Volcano eruption Beck, the tourism chief, said it felt like deja vu reading the Warriors’ comments.“It was like, ‘Oh no, not again’ and then, ‘Wait a minute, this is an opportunity,” Beck said.Beck’s team then created the website, produced the video and rolled out a social media plan.“Everybody knows we have great red rock and everybody knows we have great snow, but they don’t know we have this incredible urban core,” Beck said.Several residents in Salt Lake City — where the Jazz dominate the sports scene — scoffed at the California players’ comments.“The Warriors were misinformed,” said Welby Evangelista, 46. “This is a town that has many things to offer … if you are looking for a bar, there’s 30 bars around us. You just have to look.”Crystal Daniels, 32, said she finds fun every night and lamented that outsiders believe you can’t drink in Utah.“Salt Lake City in a nutshell: Everybody has this idea that it’s basically ruled by the church,” said Dustin Smith, 28. “It’s unfortunate that people perceive it that way. There’s a lot of great things going on. … All you got to do is walk in and actually meet people.”Beck said his office is discussing options with Jazz officials about possible events over the weekend to have more fun with the Warriors.“We’re floating around some really good ideas,” Beck said. Ex-Bulacan town vice mayor, village chief shot dead In this photo, Utah Jazz fan Nick Maneotis, 31, drinks a beer on a roof top deck as his friend watches a Jazz game, in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City leaders and tourism officials playfully jabbed back at Golden State Warriors players who bemoaned the lack of nightlife in Utah, hoping to combat the predominantly Mormon state’s reputation as a boring place where it’s tough to get a drink. The tourism agency in the state capital launched a new website and video Monday titled, “There’s nothing to do in Salt Lake” that features people enjoying drinks and food at popular breweries, bars, restaurants and sporting venues. APSALT LAKE CITY — Salt Lake City tourism officials playfully jabbed back at Golden State Warriors players who bemoaned the lack of nightlife in Utah, hoping to combat the predominantly Mormon state’s reputation as a boring place where it’s tough to get a drink.The tourism agency in the state capital launched a new website and video titled, “There’s nothing to do in Salt Lake” that features people enjoying drinks and food at popular breweries, bars, restaurants and sporting venues. The words “no fun” and “no drinking” sarcastically flash across images in the video.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more