DEATH NOTICES: Oct. 26, 2020

first_img James O. Byrd, of Kemah, Texas (formerly of Port Neches, Texas) died Saturday, October 24, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Port Neches. Lee Terro, 87, of Port Neches, Texas died Saturday, October 24, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Port Neches.last_img

Leon Edward Kethley

first_img He was preceded in death by his mother and father and his loving wife of 70 years, Shirley Dell Randle Kethley.Leon is survived by his five children, Katherine Allred and her husband, Lonnie, of Franklinville, North Carolina; Jackie Ann Kethley of Port Acres, Texas; Hulette Kethley and his wife, Denise, of Port Acres, Texas; Leon Edward Kethley, Jr. of Beaumont, Texas; and Reverend Timothy Paul Kethley and his wife, Cynthia, of West Columbia, Texas.Known as “Bubba” by siblings, family, and friends, Leon was also known as “Granddaddy” by six grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. He was indeed a loving and lovable grandfather. Other survivors include his siblings: Ruby Kethley Parker and her husband Billy and their children and families; Alice Kethley; and Jack Kethley and his wife Dixie and their sons and families and his sister-in-law, Ethel Randle.Leon attended Stephen F. Austin HS in Port Acres, graduating in 1950.He lived a full life and enjoyed many activities and ministries.Leon, a well-known inspector and general foreman, retired from Texaco Star Enterprise after 42 years. He was involved in Boy Scouts, where he was a Scout Master of Troop 91 and a recipient of the Silver Beaver award for his services.Leon enjoyed athletics his entire life, playing football, track, and basketball, although he often said basketball was only played to stay in shape between the two other sports.He participated in the 1949 Texas State Championships for track and field, where he finished second in the one-mile race.Leon left bountiful memories behind with his children and grandchildren, playing many backyard basketball and football games as if he was still a teenager.Leon loved nothing more than taking care of his high school sweetheart bride.Together they built a family full of love.Their goal was to make sure that their grandchildren would grow to know one another no matter the distance; hence, there were many memorable road trips with a van full of grandkids!You would often find him behind that large, shoulder-type video camera capturing the lives of those he loved. Leon spent many hours in his garden, where he grew beautiful flowers and some of the best big red tomatoes.If he was not in the garden, he could be found in his shop, tinkering and learning the mechanical side of how things worked.Leon was a die-hard Duke Blue Devils and Dallas Cowboys fan, never missing a game on TV.He also enjoyed listening to some of the great music of country singer Hank Williams, Sr.The family will be hosting family and friends on Friday, January 8, 2021 at St. John’s United Methodist Church in Port Acres at 9 am, with a celebration of life service at 10 am in the sanctuary.Interment will follow at Oak Bluff Cemetery in Port Neches, Texas.The family asks that all donations be made to St. John’s United Methodist Church.Due to the Covid-19 crisis we are currently in, all visitors to the funeral home and the church are required to wear facemask or covering and practice social distancing as mandated by the State and County officials.center_img Leon Edward Kethley, 89, of Port Acres, Texas, passed to Heaven to join his bride on Monday, January 4, 2021.He died peacefully at his home in Port Acres, Texas, where he was surrounded by his loving family.Leon was born on August 14, 1931, to Leon and Ruby Kethley of Port Arthur, Texas.last_img read more

Sound of Music Exclusive! Listen to Christian Borle, Laura Benanti & Stephen Moyer Sing ‘No Way to Stop It’

first_imgHere’s one of our favorite things—an exclusive premiere of a track which will be featured on the upcoming The Sound of Music telecast! Check out below a clip of Tony winners Christian Borle (Max) Laura Benanti (Elsa) and True Blood hunk Stephen Moyer (Captain von Trapp) singing “No Way to Stop It,” a tongue-in-cheek Rodgers and Hammerstein tune that didn’t appear in the 1965 film, but did in the original 1959 Broadway mounting. In the telecast, which follows the stage show’s book, Elsa and Max argue with the Captain about wanting to stand up for his political views and try to convince him that his efforts are useless. The live TV staging of the beloved musical also stars Carrie Underwood as Maria and Tony winner Audra McDonald as Mother Abbess. The Sound of Music album is released December 3 and you can see the hills come alive again December 5 on NBC! Star Files Laura Benanti Christian Borle View Commentslast_img read more

Universities/Higher Education

first_imgOnslow County has plenty of opportunities for continuing education. Education centers at MCB Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River offer adult and continuing education opportunities for personal growth and career development. These centers provide basic academic advising, financial aid information, military and civilian testing programs, information about on-base colleges and universities, and more. Use the following contact information to start your search for the school that is right for you.On-base Education CentersJohn A. Lejeune Education CenterBuilding 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-451-3091MCAS New River Education CenterBuilding AS-212, Bancroft St.MCAS New River 910-449-5421www.mccslejeune-newriver.com/eduAmerican Military UniversityNorth Carolina military ed manager 757-335-2779www.amu.apus.eduBoston University Metropolitan CollegeBuilding 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-451-5574Building 4335, C St.MCAS Cherry Point 252-447-5036www.bu.edu/military/lejeune-cherry-pointCampbell UniversityBuilding 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-893-7059https://aoe.campbell.edu/camp-lejeuneCoastal Carolina Community College444 Western Blvd.Jacksonville, NC 28546 910-455-1221Building 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-451-2391Building AS-212, Bancroft St.MCAS New River 910-449-6926www.coastalcarolina.eduEmbry-Riddle Aeronautical UniversityBuilding 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-451-0174http://worldwide.erau.edu/locations/camp-lejeuneMiller-Motte College1291 Hargett St.Jacksonville, NC 28540 910-778-9304www.miller-motte.edu/campuses/jacksonville-career-trainingSouthern Illinois University CarbondaleBuilding AS-212, Bancroft St.MCAS New River 910-451-5575http://siu.eduUniversity of Mount Olive2543 Onslow DriveJacksonville, NC 28540 910-455-1677https://umo.edu/locations/jacksonvilleUniversity of North Carolina Wilmington at Onslow444 Western Blvd.Jacksonville, NC 28546 910-938-6737Building 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-451-5266Building AS-212, Bancroft St.MCAS New River 910-449-4440www.uncw.edu/onslowUniversity of Phoenix886-766-0766www.phoenix.eduBuilding 825, Stone St.MCB Camp Lejeune 910-451-0951www.webster.edu/camp-lejeunelast_img read more

Mission and Vision

first_imgMissionThe mission of the 460th Space Wing is: We are ready forces providing space-based warning and awareness–protecting the homeland and global warfighters. VisionThe wing’s vision is: America’s premier space wing delivering unrivaled space operations and installation support for the Nation’s Defense.last_img

Biking The Iron Curtain Trail

first_imgJoshua Hammer is a freelance foreign correspondent for the NY Times and is based in Berlin. He and Mark Simon, also from the NY Times, recently documented a cycling trip that followed along the Iron Curtain (the ideological and physical boundary dividing Europe into two separate areas from the end of World War II in 1945 until the end of the Cold War in 1991).The article is full of interesting information about the history of Germany, military activity, various cultures, foods and geography. It’s amazing how much fun learning can be when you throw in a bike!Read the Full Story Here.last_img read more

Pacenti Cycle Design Updates SL23 Road Rim

first_imgIt’s not as radical as their new PDent bar and stem system, but Pacenti just dropped some updates on their SL23 rim. The outside of the rim has been widened by 0.5mm, but the internal width is over 2mm wider making it effectively a wider design. The bead hooks also sit lower for a tubeless friendly rim profile that will seal up with tubeless tape. Available in 20, 24, 28, and 32h versions in 700c, weights are listed at 430g. The rims use a welded joint, bead blasted finish, and a thicker spoke bed for more durability at the nipple junction. Still built from 6061-T6 aluminum, rims will sell for $109 and are available now.pacenticycledesign.comlast_img read more

HED Cycling Introduces New 650c Ardennes, Jets to Small Wheel Lineup

first_imgThis spring, HED Cycling will release the Ardennes SL 650c to join their Jet and HED3 wheels for smaller riders.The 650c Ardennes SL will be a clincher only with CX Ray spokes. Retail will be $1,1oo and claimed weight is 1,406g. HED will offer it with a Powertap rear hub, too. They use the same C2 rim extrusion as their 700c Ardennes rims, they just re-roll it into the smaller size. They’re shown above in front of HED’s standard 700c models.HED’s rep said it’s been a long time since they’ve updated the 650c wheel line but that demand has been pretty high. The samples pictured above are already sold to a dealer in Texas that couldn’t wait for the production models.The Jet6 and Jet9 650c wheels get the updated C2 rim profile, too, which is wider at 23mm outside width, up from the original 19mm. Compared the Ardennes, the Jet’s use a 3K carbon fairing glued on in either 60mm or 90mm depths, making them the more aerodynamic option.SIDEBAR: The difference between 650c and 650b is 13mm and is a reference to the BSD (Bead Seat Diameter). The 650b has a larger diameter at the bead seat, measuring 584mm. A 650c rim should measure 571mm at the bead seat. To totally fry your brain, see Sheldon Brown’s complete guide to wheel sizes here.last_img read more

Found: Zukas Cycles – Gorgeous Custom Steel Bicycles from Augusta, GA

first_imgThis red and black road bike is for a shop owner who’s very particular.The bottom bracket shell uses a Z shaped drain hole with mesh to keep debris and such out. It’s a super nice touch that most people will never see.Many small custom builders will bring the cable out of the downtube, around the BB shell and back into the stays, but Nate said he thought that ruined the aesthetic so he keeps it internal as far as he can.The ISP frame uses a Thomson seatpost cut extra short to give it a bit of adjustment. The Campagnolo cable housing was cut so that the logo was centered exactly at the seatmast. Nate Zukas has been making frame for only about a year and a half, but has been painting, repairing and modifying them for a while. His last name is Lithuanian for white rabbit, and somewhere on each frame you’ll find a painted white rabbit or two hiding somewhere. He makes custom steel road, mountain, cyclocross and other style bikes in Augusta, GA. He paints all the frames, too, and they’re really, really well done.For a relatively young builder, his bikes showed an awfully high degree of finish quality and unique touches. The single speed/fixed gear city bike above is a fabulous example of “other” and has a hidden brake cable for the front disc. Check out more on this and his other bikes after the break… A very nice cyclocross bike.Note the brake noodle and integrated guide on the bottom of the stem!…and a 29er mountain bike.For this bike, the rear derailleur cable had to jump out of the frame to get around the seatpost.Another example of the bottom bracket……with a very slick front derailleur cable exit poking out of the lug. Nice use of an old cable condom, too!Check them out at ZukasCycles.comlast_img read more

Review: Orbea Odin and Thor Helmets

first_imgAfter the initial announcement of the 2011 Orbea helmets (sizing, colors, and MSRP, and other information in this post) we grabbed a few for some hands on and heads in testing. Evan and I wore the Odin, and Matt wore the Thor (pictured above).After comparing notes, we weren’t surprised to have had very similar experiences. We all immediately noticed the dramatic styling (a mix between awe-inspiring and goofy-looking) but promptly forgot it once the helmets were properly installed. It didn’t take months of riding to appreciate the comfort of Orbea’s subtle enhancements, but it did give us time to try and find something we didn’t like about the helmets, which collectively, was nearly nothing.Information on the little details, weights, photos, and our thoughts and feelings below… Two other impressive comfort features include the additional padding on the rear size adjusters, and the location of the chinstrap connections to the helmet. Unlike my private stock, the Odin’s chinstraps are not mounted directly to the bottom edge of the helmet. The front straps are connected higher inside the helmet, and the rear straps are connected on the top of the head, mounted to the plastic support of the size adjusters. This helps even out the weight of the helmet and adds greater stability. DANIEL’S REVIEW OF THE ODINUnless you’re blind or shop with your eyes closed, the first thing you’ll notice about the Odin is the blunt front end and round body with sweeping, curving lines. I had to double check which end was the front and which was the rear. Ultimately the helmet looks too serious to assume any design queues are a mistake, so I moved past the first date and really started getting to know it.Long story short, the fit is incredible. Compared to my current helmet (same ~$200 MSRP), the Odin provides an entirely different, and appreciated, level of comfort. It sits lower on my head, giving it a more secure, well-balanced feeling. Even when loaded down with a headlamp during the BURN 24 Hour mountain bike race, the Odin felt impressively stable. It didn’t bobble like many other helmets do.In addition to the obvious external air flow designs; the Odin has a clever internal (inside the helmet, not inside the material) design as well. Your head does not sit flush with the inside of the helmet in parallel sections. Instead, there are extra tiers in the underside that rest above the forehead and allow air flowing into the helmet to flow around your head inside the helmet, and not just over only the exposed areas of your head. Notice how the blue pads in the center of the helmet do not connect. The areas around the blue pads allow excellent airflow around the head. WEIGHTSOn the left, the Thor (medium) weighed in at 306 grams. Centered is the Odin (large) at 368 grams. On the right is the Odin (small). The Odin is marketed as a lightweight helmet, but never as the lightest helmet. The deeper profile, extra material, and additional padding, such as the additional padding on the rear size adjustors, add a few extra grams compared to other helmets in its price range. The result, however, is an impressively balanced, well-constructed, very comfortable helmet. For comparison, I weighed a Specialized S-Works size large at 307 grams. The extra 61 grams of the Odin is not a sacrifice.center_img MATT’S REVIEW OF THE THOR (Matt is pictured at very top of review wearing the Orbea Thor in Sky Blue)I have logged somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 rides in weather ranging from low 20 degree days to 80+ degree days and under the guise of night with the Orbea Thor entrusted to protect the wealth of knowledge my skull contains.  So what do I think? How did it do?It was not love at first sight.  The Thor is not a bad looking helmet but it does look a little different. I was also somewhat disappointed when I pulled it out of the box and it had a 2 button tensioning system, something that I had just made a point to move away from with my last helmet purchase.   All helmets look tall and goofy atop our heads, but the Thor seems to take the cake.  I think I ducked the first time I walked out the door for a road ride with the Thor on.  I think that situation would have been helped slightly by a darker color or black but the White/Sky Blue seemed to make me feel like an overly tall being with a cloud on my head.  My personal preference is a helmet with sharper lines like the Odin but when it comes down to it what truly matters is: Did it keep me safe?  Does it regulate temperature well?So how did it do?I was very pleased with how the Thor stacked up against my expectations and previous helmets.  I got over the appearance (or my perception of its appearance) surprisingly quick once I got it on my head and started logging miles.  The tensioning system that I had intentionally avoided in my most recent helmet purchase was very easy to use and did a very good job of providing even pressure and contact around my head.  The pads were comfortable and the chinstrap even came with a cute and slightly functional pad.  It absorbed sweat, kept the excess straps contained and was softer to the touch than any other helmet I’ve worn.   Once I got my longer winter hair trimmed I was impressed with the airflow and temperature regulation the Thor provided.   It is a little louder than my other current helmet but is only really an issue on the road and a small issue at that.  The Thor did well with keeping my whole head cool.  It seemed to allow air to flow in at the front of the helmet and pull air off of the back of the head with force to make a noticeable difference.   As tall as the Thor looked it didn’t seem to be top heavy, even with a light mounted to the top.  It stayed put and handled the extra weight without any change in comfort.  And, finally, just to be thorough I wrecked quite hard – twice, at night – only so I would be able to give the most comprehensive review possible.  This test was also passed by the Thor.Final Thoughts:  The Thor may not have been my first choice of helmets based on appearance alone, but overall I was very impressed with how it performed.  This helmet may not be for everyone. But if you want a helmet that is easy to use, will keep you cool and stand out in the crowd…The Thor is worth a look the next time you go shopping for a new lid. EVAN’S REVIEW OF THE ODINI was intrigued to try out the Orbea Odin never having much exposure to helmet brands beyond Specialized and Giro. Right out of the box, I was impressed with its design. The folks at Orbea have come up with some aggressive looking molds that scream, “I’m wicked fast!”Once on my noggin’, I was pleased with the way the Odin felt. It is lightweight and has an even distribution of comfortable contact points. Tensioning came with ease as the helmet cinches up quickly with the notched band in the back. Once tightened, the Odin holds firm and has solid retention. It has a compact form and does not look or feel obtrusive on the head.In motion, the well-vented Odin is surprisingly cool and quiet (does not disturb the air to the point of making any unusual noises). The air channels function very well and I remember being out on a particularly hot day on a road ride and being impressed by how little my head sweated.I have spent probably 20-25 rides in the Orbea Odin at this point and have enjoyed each experience. It has served as a quality helmet that has good looks and functionality. I really do not have any complaints and would say it would be a highly competitive option against any of the other helmets in its range.last_img read more