Pepe ‘honoured’ to play alongside Arsenal heroes

first_imgNicolas Pepe has said he was inspired to join Arsenal to emulate his heroes past a present after sealing a move to North London in a club record deal. Pepe joined the Gunners for £72 million ($87m) from Lille in a long-anticipated move, becoming the most expensive acquisition by an English club so far in the transfer window.The 24-year-old winger said it would be an honour to play alongside players he had admired while plying his trade in Ligue 1 as he now moves to a club with a long history of international stars. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? “When I knew I was coming to Arsenal, I immediately thought of the French guys who play here,” Pepe, and Ivory Coast international raised in France, told the club’s official website .“I thought of [Mesut] Ozil, the world champion, [Alexandre] Lacazette, [Pierre-Emerick] Aubameyang and many more. Of course, these are players who sprang to mind because I used to watch them when I was at Lille.“Also, Lacazette used to play for Lyon and so I have had the opportunity to play against him. It will be an honour to play alongside him.”Pepe was not only influenced by players from his adopted country of France, where he had spent the entirety of his professional career before moving to London.He joins a list of several Ivorians to play for the Gunners, and says they have also offered advice as to how he might make an impact at the Emirates now that he has secured his long-awaited move.“Kolo Toure was with [the Ivory Coast] squad as an assistant coach [at the Africa Cup of Nations],” Pepe added .“He spoke to me a lot about the very high level, how he got to Arsenal and how you always have to work hard and really graft on a daily basis to get right to the very top.“Toure, [Emannuel] Eboue and Gervinho are the major players from the Ivory Coast.“We talk a lot about Gervinho, for example, who played for Lille and ended up at Arsenal, so I am on the same path.“They are definitely examples to us young Ivorians and I hope we will continue to follow these examples.”last_img read more

Small islands need partnerships to battle climate change address unique vulnerabilities says

“Combatting climate change, promoting sustainable development and addressing the vulnerabilities of SIDS will demand partnership, capacity and leadership,” said Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who recalled that the SAMOA Pathway is here “to guide us.” Last year’s Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States in Samoa increased global attention on their contributions to sustainable development – but also on their unique vulnerabilities, Mr. Ban reminded to the Council members, who were meeting for an unprecedented debate about the situation of these countries. From traditional armed conflict to transnational crime and piracy, illicit exploitation of natural resources, climate change and climate-related natural disasters and uneven development, small island developing States face a range of peace and security challenges, according to the concept note provided by New Zealand, which holds the rotating Presidency of the Security Council for the month of July. Caribbean SIDS, for example, are vulnerable to drug-trafficking and gang-related violence, noted the Secretary-General, while unreported and unregulated fishing undermine local economies. Through its Maritime Crime Programme, the UN Office on Drugs and Crime is actively engaged to help these countries in these areas. “Taken together with the broader vulnerabilities faced by many of these States communities, these challenges can disproportionately affect national stability, fuel conflict across regions and ultimately have an impact on the maintenance of international peace and security,” adds the Security Council concept note. For the Secretary-General, the first priority must be to support these States in achieving the Millennium Development Goals. “Second, we need a post-2015 development agenda and sustainable development goals that address the needs of SIDS,” he continued. At the recent Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa, which took place from July 13 to 16, it was encouraging that the concerns of [that group of countries] were reflected, including in critical areas such as debt, trade, technology and Official Development Assistance, Mr. Ban noted. “Third, we need a meaningful and universal global climate agreement in Paris in December,” stressed the UN chief, as small island developing States are on the front lines of climate change. “Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu is only the latest in a long string of devastation that SIDS have endured and will continue to endure as long as climate change is not adequately addressed,” he warned, underscoring that Caribbean countries sometimes experience as many as five hurricanes in a season. Rising sea levels, dying coral reefs and the increasing frequency and severity of natural disasters exacerbate the conditions leading to community displacement and migration, threatening to increase tensions over resources and affect domestic and regional stability, the Secretary-General went on to say. “Leading by example,” many of these countries have been accelerating their own transition to renewable energy to secure a sustainable energy future. But, to support SIDS in their actions to combat climate change and adapt to its impacts, “a politically credible trajectory for mobilizing the pledged $100 billion dollars per year by 2020” is needed, he explained. The Green Climate Fund will need to be up and running before the Climate Conference in Paris in December, but a “meaningful, universal climate agreement” must be adopted, concluded the Secretary-General. read more