Harden calls out Mavericks after Rockets’ heated win

first_img“That other team was trippin’ tonight, just disrespectful, unprofessional, players and coaches,” Harden said. “I don’t know what was their problem, but I think that got us going. They wanted to throw a little cheap shot and just woke us up a little bit and it was over from there.”Bogut was equally frustrated in his return after missing 11 games with a right knee injury. The call came in the second quarter, near the end of a 16-0 Houston run that broke a 37-all tie. Harden doubled over after running head-first into the 7-foot, 260-pound Bogut’s shoulder.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“If you watch the replay, yeah, he made no effort to run around my screen,” said Bogut, who had a couple of sharp verbal exchanges with Harden. “Yeah, it was a hard screen and I set hard screens. But to get a flagrant for it is kind of head-scratching.“You admire the effort the league’s putting in in Secaucus (New Jersey) with that beautiful facility where they watch replays and watch TV and have leather chairs and all that kind of stuff. But you scratch your head at a lot of these things and it becomes very, very frustrating.” Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13) had the ball pushed away by Dallas Mavericks defender Dirk Nowitzki (41) on the drive to the basket during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Dallas, Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2016. APDALLAS — James Harden was called for one of the eight technicals in a game that turned tense when Dallas center Andrew Bogut received a flagrant foul on a hard screen that staggered Houston’s star guard.Despite 34 points and an easy 123-107 victory that completed a four-game season sweep of the last-place Mavericks on Tuesday night, Harden wasn’t happy.ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes View comments EDITORS’ PICK Kevin Durant calls for NBA to toss Last Two Minute Report Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town The Mavericks had their projected starting five for just the fourth time, and first since a 128-90 loss at Cleveland on Nov. 25. The lineup is winless. Bogut and Nowitzki, in his third game back from his latest absence for a sore right Achilles tendon, stayed in the locker room at halftime. Bogut went scoreless with six rebounds in 10 minutes, and Nowitzki scored seven points.UP NEXTRockets: Start a four-game homestand against the Clippers on Friday. It matches their longest of the season.Mavericks: After a night off, Dallas continues stretch of four games in five nights with back-to-back at Lakers (Thursday) and Golden State (Friday).Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next We are young Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Harrison Barnes scored 21 for the last-place Mavericks, who lost their second straight following their first two-game winning streak of the season.There were also two flagrant fouls, both against Dallas.Most of the technicals came during dead-ball situations, with players and Dallas coach Rick Carlisle complaining to officials. Carlisle mockingly clapped at the refs, saying “good call,” after he was whistled for one.“They tried to defend by being real physical and thinking that’s the way to do it,” Houston coach Mike D’Antoni said. “I don’t really want to get into it just because it doesn’t serve any purpose. We needed the win. We came out and we took care of business.”TIP-INSRockets: G Patrick Beverley sat out with a left quadriceps contusion. It’s not expected to be a long-term injury. … Sam Dekker had a game-high 11 rebounds. … The Rockets are 7-0 on the second night of back-to-backs this season.Mavericks: G Pierre Jackson was signed off the Mavericks’ NBA Development League team, and G Jonathan Gibson was waived. Jackson, a former Baylor guard who was drafted in 2013, made his NBA debut in the fourth quarter and scored seven points. … Matthews had 19 points.BESIDES THE TECHSThere were a couple of face-to-face confrontations, the first ending in double technicals in the second quarter for Dallas’ Justin Anderson and Nene. Later in the quarter, Houston’s Ryan Anderson went nose-to-nose with Dallas star Dirk Nowitzki without a technical being called.RARE GATHERING MOST READ Senators to proceed with review of VFA Trevor Ariza was ejected after his second technical during the break after the third quarter, when five technicals were called. After the game, he was waiting outside the Dallas locker room for Mavericks center Salah Mejri.Security had to make sure the pair didn’t interact after an exchange during the game that led to Ariza’s first technical. Houston was called for five and Dallas three.“It wasn’t even basketball,” Dallas guard Wesley Matthews said. “Tempers, two in-state teams, we play each other four times, we’ve had battles in the past, so it is what it is. But we’ve got to be better than that. That was an opportunity for us to channel it into basketball and we didn’t do that.”Harden had 24 points at halftime and finished with 11 assists without playing in the fourth quarter. The Rockets improved to 13-2 in December.With two games left in the month, Houston can tie the franchise record of 15 wins from November 1996.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Uncle Doc Wants Parents to Encourage Kids to Play Sports

first_imgDoc Lawson, ex United States Major League Soccer (MLS) player of Liberian origin has called on Liberian parents to encourage their kids to play sports.Known affectionately by kids as Uncle Doc, the Chief Executive Officer and president of United States based not for profit organization, DonamiSports, said he is happy to make his contribution to the happiness of kids in Liberia.“We intend to organize similar happy moments for kids throughout the country,” Uncle Doc said. “We believe that kids need to play sports; and therefore, we need to keep their interest in sports.”He told the Daily Observer last Saturday, when he held a fun game for 400 kids in Duport Road community, that the program will be bigger next year.“My major interest is to give kids the moment of their lives, to be with each other as they engage in sports. I think it is an important experience for them,” he said.Uncle Doc said his partners in the United States are passionate about helping Liberian children to simply have fun through playing soccer.“I saw the excitement on the faces of all those 400 kids and I am satisfied that working with others, including the Liberia Young Men Christian Association, we were able to direct our energies to make those children happy.“That’s why I think it is important for adults and parents in particular to remember kids and make them part of what they do for leisure,” Uncle Doc said.He said he is grateful to few volunteers who joined him and worked hard to give the kids the best experience of their young lives.DonamiSports/YMCA provided jerseys and medals for all 400 kids who participated in the one day soccer jamboree. The kids’ ages ranged from three to seven.Recently, more than 10 communities in Monrovia, Kakata and Gbarnga concluded U-12 and 14 soccer tournaments under the sponsorship of DonamiSports/YMCA.DonamiSports, he said, use sports as a vehicle to get kids to play with each and to develop the ability to work together as teams, an invaluable asset for their development as members of the Liberian community.Doc is also the global ambassador for The Last Well, a US based organization that is determined to provide safe drinking water, alongside the Gospel of Jesus Christ, for all Liberian communities by 2020.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Buzzing ‘bee song’ tells farmers which crops will produce

first_img Bombus sylvicola buzz Buzzing ‘bee song’ tells farmers which crops will produce 00:0000:0000:00 Like jets radioing in their call signs to air traffic control, bees’ buzzing could help scientists know who’s pollinating what over large swaths of land, leading to better farming methods and more productive crops. In the past, farmers have relied on visual surveys for insight into pollinator activity—a time-consuming and expensive process. But one team of researchers thought the bees’ buzzes might do a better job of giving them away. So they cataloged the body traits of different bees—like tongue length, wing length, and body size—that influence both which plants they pollinate and the acoustic frequency of their buzzing. The researchers then nailed down the acoustic signatures of two bumble bee species near Boulder, Colorado, Bombus balteatus (above) and B. sylvicola.  Bombus balteatus buzz center_img 00:0000:0000:00 By Michael PriceJun. 7, 2017 , 2:00 PM The researchers used field recording equipment to listen for those frequencies in different wildflower patches over two flowering seasons. The buzzes alone allowed the researchers to estimate the number of bees in a given area, they report today in PLOS ONE. What’s more, by systematically excluding certain bee traits—like shorter tongues—and then tracking which plants got pollinated in a given area, they were able to link certain acoustic frequencies to the successful pollination of different flowering clovers, including Trifolium dasyphyllum and T. parryi. That means that they could—in theory—figure out which bees are where, and what work they do, during each pollinating season. And by actively monitoring the soundscapes around their fields, growers could know whether they have the right bees for the job—or whether they need to call in reinforcements.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

LEDs created from wonder material could revolutionize lighting and displays

first_img N. Zhou et al., Sci. Adv. 5, EAAV8141 (2019) LEDs created from wonder material could revolutionize lighting and displays By Robert F. ServiceJun. 4, 2019 , 4:45 PM When combined with polarizing filters, 3D-printed perovskite nanowires produce adjustable multicolor displays. In solar cells, the cheap, easy to make materials called perovskites are adept at turning photons into electricity. Now, perovskites are turning the tables, converting electrons into light with an efficiency on par with that of the commercial organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) found in cellphones and flat screen TVs. And in a glimpse of how they might one day be harnessed, researchers reported last week in Science Advances that they’ve used a 3D printer to pattern perovskites for use in full-color displays.“It’s a fantastic result, and quite inspirational,” says Richard Friend, a physicist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom whose team created the first perovskite LED in 2014. The result raises hopes that the computer screens and giant displays of the future will consist of these cheap crystalline substances, made from common ingredients. Friend cautions, however, that the new perovskite displays aren’t yet commercially viable.The materials in current semiconductor LEDs, including the organic versions, require processing at high temperatures in vacuum chambers to ensure the resulting semiconductors are pristine. By contrast, perovskites can be prepared simply by mixing their chemical components in solution at room temperature. Only a brief heat treatment is needed to crystallize them. And even though the perovskite crystals end up with imperfections, these defects typically don’t destroy the materials’ ability to emit light.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In most perovskite LEDs, electrodes sandwiching the light-emitting material deliver charges—negatively charged electrons and positively charged electron vacancies. When the charges meet at the center of the sandwich, electrons fill the vacancies and give up a bit of their energy as a photon of light.The color of the photon depends on the perovskite’s chemical constituents, enabling researchers to tune the color by changing the perovskite’s recipe. The Cambridge group’s first perovskite LEDs glowed near-infrared, red, or green, depending on their makeup. Since then, the team and other groups have made a full spectrum of colors.The earliest perovskite LEDs converted only 0.76% of electrons into photons. That’s because electrical charges moving through the material got stuck at the boundaries between the myriad crystallites making up the material. But numerous teams have overcome that hurdle. Late last year in Nature Photonics, for example, Friend’s group reported that by adding a light-emitting polymer layer that helps steer charges around the surface defects, it had made red perovskite LEDs with an efficiency of 20.1%.A team led by chemist Edward Sargent at the University of Toronto in Canada took a different approach last year, spiking its perovskite recipe with an additive that formed crystalline shells around the perovskite crystallites. The shells blocked the defects from trapping charges, resulting in a green perovskite LED with 20.3% efficiency, the team reported in Nature. That remains well below the efficiency of many inorganic LEDs, but is probably good enough for some applications.Researchers led by Feng Gao, a physicist at Linköping University in Sweden, reported online on 25 March in Nature Photonics that they developed yet another way to tackle the defect problem. They targeted the tendency of lead ions at the edges of perovskite crystallites to trap passing electrons. With an additive that bound to the lead, they reduced the ions’ hunger for electrons and created a near-infrared LED that had 21.6% efficiency.The pace of improvements in the past 5 years has been “quite exceptional,” Friend says. Still, none of the perovskite devices survives more than about 50 hours, well below the estimated 10,000 hours needed for commercial use. Just why the perovskite crystals fall apart after a few dozen hours isn’t clear, Gao says. But short lifetimes also plagued early organic LEDs, he notes. And perovskite solar cell–makers have largely solved similar longevity issues by protecting their devices from air and humidity. “I’m optimistic this area can also develop quickly, and perovskite LEDs can improve,” Gao says.If they do, the latest work from researchers led by Jennifer Lewis, a materials scientist at Harvard University, could point to new strategies for constructing displays. Lewis and her colleagues used a 3D printer to arrange tiny, wire-shaped perovskite structures in multicolor displays. As the “ink” carrying the nanowires passed through the printer nozzle, shear forces aligned them, Lewis says. The common orientation of the nanowires gave light from each LED a single preferred oscillation, or polarization.For their prototype displays, Lewis’s team didn’t wire each LED to electrodes; instead, the researchers exposed the entire display to ultraviolet (UV) light. Like an applied electric voltage, the UV light kicks electrons out of their normal state, allowing them to move. Then, they can recombine with vacancies and emit visible light. But because the emitted light was polarized, Lewis and her colleagues could use polarizing filters to control it.In one example, the researchers used three different perovskite formulations to create displays in which each pixel contained a red, green, and blue spot side by side, with the orientation of the nanowires in each spot offset by 60°. By rotating a polarizing filter, the researchers could mix colors or isolate a single color.Plenty of hurdles remain for perovskite LEDs, Sargent says. But he adds, “This work jumps ahead 10 years in the future and shows what cool things we can do.”last_img read more