Oregon Arrests Prompt Reaction from NC Sportsmen

first_imgOne person is dead and the leader of the group occupying federal property in Oregon, Ammon Bundy, is under arrest, along with several fellow protesters.The FBI and local law enforcement agencies stopped the group Tuesday outside of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.Sportsmen and women in North Carolina and the rest of the country have opposed the takeover of the refuge.Richard Mode, affiliate representative with the North Carolina Wildlife Federation, says because the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge belongs to taxpayers it is a personal issue for every American.“Those public lands are our lands,” says Mode. “They never were the state of Oregon’s, they’ve always been federal lands. Every citizen in America owns those lands and they’re very important to us.”Bundy and others are facing federal felony charges of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. through the use of force from discharging their official duties.The protesters were demanding the federal government release ranchers convicted of arson on federal lands, turn federal lands over to private ownership, void federal grazing permits and allow the local management of the lands in question.The NWF and other supporters who opposed the takeover of the refuge say local control of the lands puts public access to areas to hunt, fish, camp, hike and other activities in jeopardy. The occupiers have complained about federal management of the lands, but Mode says placing lands in local control would endanger a public resource.“The government is us,” he says. “We’re the owners of that property as citizens of America. We use it. It’s an important part of our outdoor heritage, our wildlife and natural resources heritage, and we want it stopped.”Mode says the issue of public lands is also an economic issue. The Outdoor Industry Association estimates public lands generate $646 billion annually in consumer spending and support more than 6 million jobs.last_img read more

METHAMPHETAMINE TRAFFICKER SENTENCED To 12.5 YEARS IN PRISON

first_imgJoel Elias Gonzalez, 53, formerly of Franklin, N.C. was sentenced yesterday to 151 months in prison followed by five years of supervised release for trafficking large quantities of crystal methamphetamine, announced Jill Westmoreland Rose, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina. Gonzalez pleaded guilty in February 2016 to one count of distribution of methamphetamine. U.S. Attorney Rose is joined in making today’s announcement by Daniel R. Salter, Special Agent in Charge of the Atlanta Field Division of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which oversees the Charlotte District Office; C.J. Hyman, Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Charlotte Field Division; Sheriff Robert L. Holland of the Macon County Sheriff’s Office; and Sheriff Chip Hall of the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office. According to filed court documents and statements made in court, from in or about June of 2015, Gonzalez was responsible for trafficking large amounts of crystal methamphetamine (crystal meth) in the Franklin, N.C. area and the Rabun County, Georgia area. Court records indicate that Gonzalez purchased the crystal meth from a source of supply in and around Atlanta, Georgia. According to court records, Gonzalez and was responsible for trafficking approximately 1.3 kilograms of crystal meth. Gonzalez is in federal custody and will be transferred to custody of the Bureau of Prisons upon designation of a federal facility. Federal sentences are served without the possibility of parole. In making today’s announcement, U.S. Attorney Rose noted that multiple agencies worked together to bring this prolific crystal methamphetamine trafficker to justice and thanked the DEA, the ATF, the Macon County Sheriff’s Office, the Jackson County’s Sheriff’s Office for investigating this case. Assistant United States Attorney Thomas Kent of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Asheville handled the prosecution.last_img read more

I Would Not Feel So All Alone, Everybody Must Get Phoned

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Analysis#web josh catone 1 Apple obviously already has a phone. Microsoft has been rumored to be making one. So has Yahoo!. And, of course, the Google phone is supposedly just around the corner. You’re not cool if you’re not rumored to be working on a phone.It’s clear that companies realize the mobile market is big and getting bigger. So where are the eBay phone rumors? Barring Apple, which is a proven gadget company, I think a phone from eBay might make more sense than phones from any of them.Of course, eBay is not a gadget company, and eBay does not make a mobile operating system (like Microsoft), or control a lot of mobile information services (like Google and Yahoo!). What eBay does own, however, are PayPal and Skype — both of which are very well suited for the mobile world. Over the weekend, Google published a patent filed in February 2006 for a mobile payment system called GPay. Duncan Riley theorized that GPay could well be the killer app for a Google phone, and would catapult them ahead of competition. “Whilst it‚Äôs certainly possible that the GPay Mobile payments system could well be platform independent,” he wrote, “given the very strong indication that Google is preparing to launch a mobile phone, GPay could end up as an exclusive GPhone offering, one that gives Google the jump over other mobile operators by enabling mobile payments natively from the handset.”What sort of competition? Well, eBay’s PayPal, for one, which launched its mobile payments service in March. As Duncan Riley notes, Google would have an advantage over PayPal by being able embed their service directly on the Google phone. Mobile payments have been huge in Japan for years, and are just catching on in Europe, but have not yet really made a splash stateside. If Google and eBay were to lock horns, however, one could expect that to change.But leaning on their mobile payments service isn’t the only reason eBay should think about creating a phone (or working closely with handset makers on new phones), the other is Skype. Third party providers like JahJah and Talkety have brought VOIP to the iPhone with specially designed web services, but neither is offered natively, so they still require that you log into the service before making a call. An eBay phone could have Skype built in, and switch to it automatically when using wifi. Skype already works with a bunch of phone makers on wifi phones, so building the capability onto a mobile phone isn’t much of a leap.ConclusionSo does it make sense for an eBay phone? Sure. As much as it makes sense for a Google phone, or a Yahoo! phone, or a Microsoft phone. Part of me thinks that these companies should stick to what they do best: software and services, and leave the phones up to the phone makers. But even if it is too early to tell if Apple’s iPhone will be a long term financial success (my guess is it will be), it has certainly raised the mindshare of the company over the past year with almost non-stop press coverage, so it is harder to argue that a phone is necessarily a bad idea.I doubt that a phone is coming from eBay, but a phone from a third-party manufacturer that ties directly with PayPal’s mobile service and Skype seems like something that is too obvious not to happen. Then again, with the recent Skype and PayPal outages, maybe eBay isn’t who we want running our mobile lives.Who do you think should make a phone? Or are you just sick of all this mobile phone talk? Leave a comment below with your thoughts.1000 mobile phones picture from Gaetan Lee.center_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

‘We are headed for a very dark period.’ Brazil’s researchers fear election of far-right presidential candidate

first_imgJair Bolsonaro leads in the polls for Brazil’s presidential election. Beset by economic woes and dissatisfied with the left-wing politicians in power for most of the past 15 years, Brazil appears poised to make a hard turn and elect a far-right candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, as its next president. His rapid ascent has unnerved local researchers, who worry about the future of Brazilian science, the protection of the country’s biodiversity, and its role in the global struggle against climate change.“I think we are headed for a very dark period in the history of Brazil,” says Paulo Artaxo, a climate change researcher at the University of São Paulo (USP) in São Paulo, Brazil. “There is no point sugarcoating it. Bolsonaro is the worst thing that could happen for the environment.”Bolsonaro has vowed to withdraw Brazil from the 2015 Paris agreement, which requires nations to reduce greenhouse emissions to combat climate change, and he plans to eliminate the Ministry of the Environment and fold its duties into the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply. The “Myth”—as his supporters call him—has also said, while campaigning in the Amazon, that Brazil has “too many protected areas” that “stand in the way of development.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The 63-year-old congressman and former army captain fell just short of winning a majority in the primary election earlier this month, and he heads into a 28 October runoff with a large lead in the polls over left-wing scholar Fernando Haddad. The plight of Brazil’s research establishment, which has endured sharp budget cuts in recent years, has had little mention in the campaigning so far. When recently asked about his possible choice for science minister, Bolsonaro named Brazilian astronaut and former air force pilot Marcos Pontes, a member of his party, as his top preference.A draft campaign document focusing on science—first revealed last week by the Brazilian newspaper O Estado de S. Paulo—offers additional insight into his plans. It pledges to more than double the level of R&D investment in the next 4 years, but would focus most of the extra money and attention on applied sciences such as space and robotics, rather than on basic research at universities.Under the slogan “Brazil above everything, God above all,” Bolsonaro’s campaign exalts national pride, military discipline, and a zero-tolerance, iron-fist stance against crime. Famous for inflammatory remarks about women and minorities, Bolsonaro openly cherishes the 21-year military dictatorship that started with a coup in 1964. Jair Bolsonaro, front-runner for Brazil’s presidency, is a scary prospect for some.  ‘We are headed for a very dark period.’ Brazil’s researchers fear election of far-right presidential candidate Victor Moriyama/Stringer/Getty Images center_img Historically, Bolsonaro has had little to do with science, and he recently sparred with the academic community, authoring legislation to favor an unproven cancer therapy. A general he picked to craft his science and education plans defended the teaching of creationism this week, telling O Estado de S. Paulo that students need to know that “Darwin existed,” but not necessarily to “agree with him.”Climate change is one scientific issue Bolsonaro has touched on. He hasn’t specifically questioned that humans are driving global warming, but his son, a popular Brazilian congressman, has done so in a video that celebrates the climate policies of U.S. President Donald Trump. And Bolsonaro has indicated that the Paris agreement’s mandate threatens Brazil’s national sovereignty, especially in the Amazon region, where deforestation for farming and cattle ranching has driven most of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.Through law enforcement and mechanisms such as incentives for sustainable practices, Brazilian authorities have substantially reduced Amazon deforestation in the past 13 years, and the nation’s commitment to the Paris climate change accord requires it to continue that trend. Bolsonaro’s campaign instead promises to promote agriculture and mining in the region. One of the generals helping develop the candidate’s policies told O Estado de S. Paulo last week that he missed the days when road builders could cut down trees in the Amazon without being bothered by environmental authorities.Unfettered development of the Amazon would be a “grave mistake,” says Eduardo Assad, a climate change and agricultural scientist at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation in Campinas. He adds that studies show Brazil’s agricultural production could be doubled by exploiting abandoned or degraded pastures and farmland—“without any additional deforestation.”Haddad, a 55-year-old professor of political science at USP, offers more moderate views, focusing on social justice and sustainable development. But corruption scandals that culminated in the impeachment of Brazil’s then-President Dilma Rousseff in August 2016 and the recent imprisonment of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who is closely associated with Haddad, have darkened his prospects. In a poll out on 15 October, he trailed Bolsonaro 41% to 59%.Haddad’s campaign has pledged to “rebuild the national science, technology, and innovation system” and provide ample public funding to help double the intensity of the country’s R&D expenditure to 2% of gross domestic product (GDP) by the year 2030. In his campaign’s draft science document, Bolsonaro pledges even more R&D investment, 2.5% of GDP by the end of his term, in 2022.Many researchers doubt that either candidate can fulfill such pledges. “I’ve heard this promise many times before,” says Fernando Peregrino, a science policy expert and president of Confies in Brasília, a national network of foundations that support scientific research and higher education. Brazil lacks the economic policies and fiscal stability to provide generous support for R&D, he believes.Bolsonaro plans to rely heavily on the private sector to boost R&D spending, through economic incentives and partnerships. “Our greatest deficit is in innovation,” says economist Marcos Cintra, president of the Brazilian Research and Innovation Agency in Rio de Janeiro, who is helping craft Bolsonaro’s R&D proposals.As for public spending, the campaign document calls for a “greater balance” between “curiosity-oriented research and research directed towards missions and goals.” Brazil’s Ministry of Education now receives 60% of federal R&D funds, compared with the Ministry of Defense’s 1.5%, and Cintra argues defense should get more. “One of the political difficulties is that public research in Brazil still has a strong academic bias, without focus or specific priorities,” Bolsonaro’s campaign document says.Luiz Davidovich, president of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences in Rio de Janeiro, agrees that it’s important to define national priorities and strategic goals, but says academic and intellectual freedom must also be preserved.Whoever wins the election, scientists here are unlikely to see any relief soon. Federal funding for the Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovation, and Communication has fallen by more than half since 2013, and the budget proposal for 2019—drafted by the current administration—predicts another 10% cut below this year’s.“Even for the most optimistic of us, it’s looking bad,” Artaxo says. Andre Coelho/Bloomberg/Getty Images By Herton EscobarOct. 16, 2018 , 5:10 PMlast_img read more

The wait for luxury wheels gets longer

first_imgDespite the general slack in demand in the automobile sector, the market for luxury cars is still booming with most manufacturers having waiting period from three to 18 months.Dealers of luxury cars say that despite the general slowdown, the demand for luxury cars has not been hampered but is growing. “There is no slowdown in the luxury car market especially for the young super rich. People understand the value of luxury and they are not only ready to pay for it but are also ready to wait for it. We have buyers who are ready to wait as long as 12-16 months for super sports car,” a senior executive at Exclusive Motors, the sole distributor of Lambourghini in Delhi, said.Due to high demand and slow delivery, buyers for luxury cars brands, including Mercedes, BMW, Porsche and Maserati, generally have to wait for six to eight months to get their car.”The demand is good in the luxury segment. The company booked 500 cars in the first five days for which delivery will be done by latest August. But the next slot of buyers may have to wait longer,” Michael Perschke, head, Audi India, told Mail Today.Waiting period is more in the super luxury segment. “For entry-level models, waiting period is maximum two to three months. Waiting period is more for imported cars as manufacturers import cars only against confirmed bookings and full payments. For cars which are assembled locally waiting period is less,” said a BMW showroom owner in Mumbai.advertisementFor some costly models of Porsche, Bentley and Lamborghini, waiting period is as high as 15 months. As these cars are customised as per specific needs of the buyer, delivery time is long, say carmakers.”Company’s aim is to satisfy customers’ needs. Cars are customised as per the buyers’ needs. That is why it takes time,” Sirish Chandra, head (communication), Porche India, said.last_img read more