The wait for luxury wheels gets longer

first_imgDespite the general slack in demand in the automobile sector, the market for luxury cars is still booming with most manufacturers having waiting period from three to 18 months.Dealers of luxury cars say that despite the general slowdown, the demand for luxury cars has not been hampered but is growing. “There is no slowdown in the luxury car market especially for the young super rich. People understand the value of luxury and they are not only ready to pay for it but are also ready to wait for it. We have buyers who are ready to wait as long as 12-16 months for super sports car,” a senior executive at Exclusive Motors, the sole distributor of Lambourghini in Delhi, said.Due to high demand and slow delivery, buyers for luxury cars brands, including Mercedes, BMW, Porsche and Maserati, generally have to wait for six to eight months to get their car.”The demand is good in the luxury segment. The company booked 500 cars in the first five days for which delivery will be done by latest August. But the next slot of buyers may have to wait longer,” Michael Perschke, head, Audi India, told Mail Today.Waiting period is more in the super luxury segment. “For entry-level models, waiting period is maximum two to three months. Waiting period is more for imported cars as manufacturers import cars only against confirmed bookings and full payments. For cars which are assembled locally waiting period is less,” said a BMW showroom owner in Mumbai.advertisementFor some costly models of Porsche, Bentley and Lamborghini, waiting period is as high as 15 months. As these cars are customised as per specific needs of the buyer, delivery time is long, say carmakers.”Company’s aim is to satisfy customers’ needs. Cars are customised as per the buyers’ needs. That is why it takes time,” Sirish Chandra, head (communication), Porche India, said.last_img read more

17 days agoThe Week in Women’s Football: Review of The Making of the Women’s World Cup

first_imgThe Week in Women’s Football: Review of The Making of the Women’s World Cupby Tim Grainey17 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveThis week, we review another recent book that came out around the 2019 Women’s World Cup in France. Kieran Theivan (based in England) and Jeff Kassouf (the founder of the excellent U.S.-based women’s football site the Equalizer) have together written The Making of the Women’s World Cup: Defining Stories from a Sports Coming of Age (Robinson, London, 2019).The book is a solid review of the previous seven Women’s World Cups. This new work certainly has a lot of information about the American team, as they won three finals, lost another and hosted two World Cup Tournaments in 1999 and 2003. Delightfully, the book—rather than a straight history—looks at the past tournaments through legendary players and teams such as Marta and Brazil in 2007, Nadine Angerer and Germany in 2003 and 2007 and Kelly Smith and England in 2015.In Chapter 1—The Early Years—Jeff Kassouf makes the point that the first Women’s World Cup (not yet having that currently strong brand as FIFA was unsure of whether it would be successful but rather called it the First FIFA World Championship for Women’s Football for the M&Ms Cup) drew strong attendance in China (where officials encouraged people to attend to boost their bid on the 2000 Olympics, which they narrowly lost to Sydney, Australia). The Americans surprised the other teams with their different attacking, pressing style as 1991 Golden Ball Winner Carin Jennings (now Gabarra) said: “I think it was the start of the U.S. women’s national team programme and the start of a programme that won three World Cups and four Olympic gold medals. That was the start of the culture of the U.S women’s national team. That culture has never wavered. That is a culture of mentality, competitiveness and hard work, along with talent. So, I think it was the start of that. That has always been there. Every person who has ever played for the US national team is connected in that regard (pages 18-19).” Chapter 2—The Birth of the Lionesses—focuses on the 2015 event in Canada through the prism of England’s path to third place. Theivan profiles Steph Houghton (Manchester City) and her elevation to team captain at the comparatively young age of 26—over previous captain Casey Stoney (31)—by former women’s national team head coach Mark Sampson, even though Houghton had missed the 2007 World Cup and 2009 Euros through injury. Houghton recalled: “I’d just moved to [Manchester] City and I had been given the armband, but in terms of my international career I was nowhere near being a regular starter. So for me I just wanted to make sure I was in the squad. Mark said he saw me as a leader of his team, but obviously there were a lot of candidates like Fara Williams and Jill Scott, who had played a number of times for England, Kelly Smith was still involved at that time, and of course Casey, who was current captain….I will always remember sitting down with him at St. George’s Park around April. I’d had the armband a few times and no way did I think it would be a possibility for the long term, but I remember him saying what I brought to the team and the sort of things he was looking for in his captain, and then he asked me if I would take the role and be the leader of the team. Obviously, you’re delighted but the rest of the conversation was a bit of a blur….For me it wasn’t working against them [the senior players], it was a case of using their experience and using them as fellow leaders to create a team environment and a special environment where we loved playing for England (pages 26-27).” Houghton is still one of the core members of the team in defense and has over 100 caps for a side that has reached the semifinals of the last two consecutive Women’s World Cups (2015 and 2019) and it was fascinating to hear in-depth from her about England’s preparation and progress to a bronze medal in Canada.Chapter 7 on Kelly Smith was entitled England’s Golden Girl Arrives—and profiles one of the leading ambassadors of the game. The former English international forward emphasized the importance of league soccer for the development of the domestic game. Smith discussed the 2005 European Championships which England hosted, which were televised throughout Europe: “The 2005 experience was amazing because we didn’t have to qualify for that tournament, and obviously it was hosted in our home country. It meant we got to play in front of our home fans and we really wanted to develop the game, and TV coverage was starting to happen, so we really wanted to play well to get people talking about women’s football. It was great because you’d go to the grounds and you’d be playing in front of fifteen to nineteen thousand, which I think was a record at that time for a women’s game. It was a lot of fun to play in (page 121).” This reporter was in Sweden and Russia for most of the tournament, where the games were televised and the tournament was an important step in the growth of the game in Europe. Smith felt quite the let down when she went back to her domestic league, even though she played for Arsenal which won the European Club Championship at the end of the 2006-07 season: “It was difficult because you know mentally what is coming from international football. But when you’re not playing at that level week in, week out and you’re playing some league games that you had won before you’d even walked onto the pitch, it makes that step up more challenging. Some of the players would have friendly bets between themselves to see what the scoreline was going to be because that’s how it was. There were probably only a few teams you knew you’d get a good game against—Charlton and Everton. You’d get into bad habits when it’s too easy. You don’t do your defensive work because you can get away with it. But at international level you can’t do that. The players knew going into the big games that you had to be switched on, and we made sure of that because we knew the magnitude of the game. The players are fitter and faster at international level, and we need to adjust to be ready for that (Page 122).” England qualified for the 2007 WWC in China but as Kieran Thievan wrote: “But all the talent in the world wouldn’t be able to compensate for the current state of domestic football in England, with players only training two to three times a week with their club, and having to balance their daily lives with their football., even though Arsenal own the league title, two cups and what is now the Women’s Champions League title (page 128).” It will be interesting to benchmark the attendance figures and reaction in the country between 2005 and 2021 when England again hosts the European Finals, in which should be an outstanding event.Chapter 8—A Hat-Trick and a Worldwide Movement focuses on now-retired American forward Abby Wambach and the prelude to the 2015 Tournament in Canada, where the games were designed from the beginning to be played on artificial turf. Wambach led an international group of 40 players and positioned FIFA and the Canadian Soccer Federation that their plan violated European charters and Canadian law for gender discrimination equality as men’s World Cups never had nor would ever be held on turf fields. Wambach said in March 2013: “We’ve worked so hard as female athletes—not only here in the United States, but internationally—to grow the game and in my opinion, I think this is taking a step back. All of the men’s international players around the world would argue the same point. A lot of these guys will not play on an artificial surface because it is an injury-prone surface and I don’t blame them (Page 143).” Kassouf writes: “Wambach would state after a January 2015 meeting with FIFA officials that the playing surface decisions were set in stone, but she would also later point out that FIFA officials had promised her that there would never again be a Women’s World Cup played on artificial turf. That’s hardly a binding contract, but it was clear that this type of battle for equality was going to be necessary, whether in 2015 or down the line (Page 145).” In France this past summer, all the games were held on grass pitches and I believe that this is a non-issue now for future tournaments, and we have Wambach and other vocal players to thank for that. Kassouf continues: “Around that same time, FIFA announced an increase in prize money for the Women’s World Cup, which was a small victory that at least appeased players. Women’s players had long been told to be thankful for what they had. The two years of battling the bigwigs over what women’s players felt was, morally and legally, gender discrimination, proved to be the exposition to the approaching tidal wave for the fight for equal rights (Page 145-146).” FIFA doubled the prize money amount (from $15 Million to $30 Million) in late December 2018 for the 2019 Women’s World Cup. We would expect that amount to continue to rise ahead of the expanded 32 team tournament in 2023.Kassouf also included interesting insight from Heather O’Reilly [who will retire from the sport at the end of this NWSL season for the reigning champions North Carolina Courage] who, “would describe the World Cups proximity to the U.S. as the perfect scenario: “The feel of a home World Cup without the pressure of being hosts (Page 147).” The level of American support in cities close to the border, particularly in Winnipeg and Vancouver, was overwhelming and a contributor to the American victory in the tournament.In Chapter 9—Australia’s Kids are Allright—the review of Australia’s Women’s National Team is a stellar job, focusing on the restructuring of the nation’s regional development system. The discussion of the Matildas 2007 World Cup campaign in China—where they opened the tournament by blasting Ghana 4-1, tied Norway 1-1 and then came back from 2-1 down to tie Canada in their last group game to advance to their first ever knockout round on an injury-time shocking goal from Cheryl Salisbury. I had covered three of Australia’s four tournament games in China—including that stunning draw in Chengdu that shattered the tournament dreams of the 2003 semifinalists Maple Leafs. Canada seemed to be cruising to a runner-up spot in the group and the knockout stage, including an 85th minute goal from Christine Sinclair, before Salisbury’s late goal just before the final whistle drew the Matildas level, vaulting the Australian side into second place in the group. Australia finished second on five points to Norway’s seven while Canada finished third on four points and the sight of the Canadian players crying and distraught on the field at the conclusion of the game sticks to me to this day. The game had been postponed a day because of a typhoon warning, though the media were not told about the delay until we were at the stadium, and the weather was not particularly threatening at that point from my standpoint. The Matildas then fell to eventual finalists Brazil 3-2 in another stirring match in Tianjin, coming back from an early 2-0 deficit and gave the favorites some troubling moments but never quit attacking; Brazilian forward Cristiane scored the winner in the 75th minute. Despite the narrow defeat to the ultimate 2007 runners-up, the Australian players after the match were cordial with the media and proud of their accomplishments; they had started a path for the national team that has led to their powerhouse status in present times and helped to propel the launch of the soon to be 12-year-old W-League the next year. The Australians, their coach Tom Sermanni and his vibrant and articulate group of players was one of the highlights of that tournament for me.This book is quite well researched and written by two experts in the game.Their focus on teams allow them to discuss key issues of the Women’s World Cup—FIFA’s initial reticence, equality issues in later years, development of youth programs and coaching regimes (Australia/Germany)—and leaves the reader with a solid understanding of the roots of the Women’s World Cup, the leading tournament and most highly visible advertisement that we currently have for the women’s game. This should be on all women’s football fans’ shelves.Tim Grainey is a contributor to Tribal Football. His latest book Beyond Bend it Like Beckham on the global game of women’s football. Get your copy today.Follow Tim on Twitter: @TimGrainey TagsOpinionAbout the authorTim Grainey FollowShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

7 hours agoArsenal hero Merson sympathises with Ozil

first_imgArsenal hero Merson sympathises with Ozilby Ansser Sadiq7 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal legend Paul Merson has sympathy for the current circumstances of Mesut Ozil.The Gunners star is enduring a frustrating period under boss Unai Emery, who refuses to pick Ozil in most of his matchday squads.The German may be the club’s highest earner, but he is struggling to get into the 25-man squads for most games.”Ozil doesn’t play because he doesn’t run around,” Merson told Sky Sports. “He would play in my team, because he can make things happen. Then you get two midfield players around him who do run around. “He’s on £350,000 a week – and that’s the problem. If he was on £10,000 a week, he would play every week even if he didn’t run around. Because he’s on £350,000 a week that means he has to. “I would be wondering how am I not getting in this team? He might have gone past the point of frustration now and be wondering, ‘what am I doing?’ You would have to weigh it up. “He played in the Watford game away and I don’t think he did anything wrong, but he hasn’t played since. He gets in my team. “Until he’s out of the club, I don’t see how Arsenal can bring new players in. If they go for a top player next summer, they will point to Ozil being on £350,000 a week. “Ramsey left the club because he wasn’t offered anywhere near the same as Ozil and he left on a free transfer.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

TMC launches music video for Lok Sabha polls

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister and TMC supremo Mamata Banerjee on Thursday launched a music video for the upcoming Lok Sabha election in the state. The 2-minute-30-second video was on the theme of peace, harmony and progress prevailing in West Bengal, in contrast to an alleged atmosphere of fear in other parts of the country. The music video was shared by Banerjee on all her social media channels Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Instagram. “I am very happy to share the new music video Maa, Mati, Manush for the forthcoming Lok Sabha Elections. Banerjee said in a post. The state, which has 42 Lok Sabha seats, will vote in all the seven phases. The Trinamool Congress last week had launched a web series christened ‘Pradhan Mantri Hisab Do’ comparing the various welfare schemes of the Narendra Modi government at the Centre with that of the TMC government in West Bengal. The first episode of the web series began with a short film comparing the state government’s ‘Sabooj Sathi’ with the Central government’s ‘Beti Bachao Beti Padhao’ scheme.last_img read more

For class XI, pass percentage touches 80%, says Delhi govt

first_imgNEW DELHI: The Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government on Wednesday said the pass percentage of Class 11 students in Delhi government schools has touched 80 per cent, the highest in the last eight years. In a statement, the government, sharing highlights of the annual exam results of all classes (other than class 10 and 12) in Delhi government schools, said: “In Class 11, there has been a significant improvement over last year’s performance”.The statistics take into account figures from 2010 onwards. While 71 per cent students of Class 11 passed their exam in 2017-18, it has improved to 80 per cent in 2018-19. From 2015-16 onwards, the pass percentage in this class has been around 72% as opposed to 63% in 2014-15. In 2018-19, it touched 80 per cent for the first time, the statistics revealed. Similarly, in class nine, the pass percentage has remained almost the same as the previous year. While 57.4 per cent students passed in 2017-18, the pass percentage for 2018-19 is 57 per cent. “There has been a slow but consistent improvement in the pass percentage over the last four years in this class due to programmes and initiatives like Chunauti and Mission Buniyaad which is strengthening the foundational learning skills of students by the time they reach Class 9,” a Delhi government official said. In 2015-16, the pass percentage in this class was 50.8 per cent which improved to 52.3 per cent the next year followed by 57.4 per cent in 2017-18. “It is important to note that the improvement recorded last year and maintained this year has been despite the change in the weightage for the external and internal component. While before 2017-18, the weightage for external was of 60 per cent, it was increased to 80 per cent as per CBSE norms,” the official added. He also said that the Delhi government is committed to deeply focus on learning outcomes in the new academic session as well and strengthen its teacher training program so that innovative pedagogies are applied by them to speed up the learning of last 30-40 per cent children in the classroom who were neglected in the past. “Apart from national and international level training, in the budget for 2019-20, Teachers Innovation Fund of Rs. 1 to 1.5 lacs per school has been announced to encourage teachers to take up projects for learning improvement among children in their respective context. For promoting excellence among students, Pratibha fellowships and the Chief Minister’s Merit scholarship have also been introduced,” the official said.last_img read more

Anti-Semitic attacks spike, killing most Jews in decades

first_imgTel Aviv: Israeli researchers reported Wednesday that violent attacks against Jews spiked significantly last year, with the largest reported number of Jews killed in anti-Semitic acts in decades, leading to an “increasing sense of emergency” among Jewish communities worldwide. Capped by the deadly shooting that killed 11 worshippers at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue on October 27, assaults targeting Jews rose 13 per cent in 2018, according to Tel Aviv University researchers. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportThey recorded nearly 400 cases worldwide, with more than a quarter of the major violent cases taking place in the United States. But the spike was most dramatic in western Europe, where Jews have faced even greater danger and threats. In Germany, for instance, there was a 70 per cent increase in anti-Semitic violence. “There is an increasing sense of emergency among Jews in many countries around the world,” said Moshe Kantor, president of the European Jewish Congress, an umbrella group representing Jewish communities across the continent. Also Read – Iraq military admits ‘excessive force’ used in deadly protests”It is now clear that anti-Semitism is no longer limited to the far-left, far-right and radical Islamist’s triangle it has become mainstream and often accepted by civil society,” he said. Tel Aviv University’s Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry releases its report every year on the eve of Israel’s Holocaust Remembrance Day, which begins Wednesday at sundown. This year, the report comes just days after another fatal shooting attack Saturday against a synagogue in southern California. The attack on the Chabad of Poway synagogue on the last day of Passover killed one woman and wounded three other people, including the rabbi. In addition to the shooting attacks, assaults and vandalism, Kantor also noted the increased anti-Semitic vitriol online and in newspapers, including a recent anti-Semitic cartoon that appeared in The New York Times’ international edition. It depicted Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a dog wearing a Star of David collar and leading a blind and skullcap-wearing President Donald Trump. The Times has since apologized, calling the image “offensive,” and vowing to refrain from publishing such bigoted cartoons again. Still, it sparked outrage among dozens of American Jewish groups that subsequently sent a letter calling on the newspaper to “become far more sensitive to anti-Semitism in the future.”last_img read more

Morocco: man arrested for raping 70 women

first_imgCasablanca – News stories on rape in Morocco are apparently not vanishing anytime soon. According to the Moroccan daily Akhbar Al Youm in its issue of Monday, a man in his fifties was arrested, this weekend in Fez, for having allegedly raped 70 women and young girls. According to the same source, the serial rapist was presented this weekend to the Attorney General. He is charged with “robbery, kidnapping and rape under the threat of a knife.”A judge has initially heard the suspect as well as the testimonies of 28 victims of the region of Fez and Sefrou. The court also expects additional complaints from other victims. The victims are allegedly from Nador, Missour, Meknes, Khoumissat and have already lodged their complaints via phone calls. The first 38 victims are aged between 6 and 45 years. The remaining victims have not yet been identified. Initial reports indicate that the rapist was accustomed to take his victims to deserted locations around Sidi Harazem, in the region of Fez. The suspect had smartly chosen these places, and allegedly had accomplices who facilitated his access to those same locations where he committed his crimes.  The accomplices have not yet been identified, according to the same source. The suspect is a 50-year-old father of three. He lived in France before returning to settle in a popular area of Saiss region, near Fez. He spent most of his days driving around, scanning bus stops and other places in search of his potential, unfortunate victims.  According to a police report, the suspect then suggested to drop his victims wherever they wanted by his car. He subsequently took them to his pre-selected locations, where he raped and robbed them of all their possessions.Following the same stream of argumentation in a previous article on this phenomenon, Morocco is increasingly becoming “rapist’s haven,” as police authority is absent in some major areas where such crimes are known to be concentrated. While the new legislations against sexual harassment are currently under governmental scrutiny, the Moroccan civil society demands that the government double efforts in combating major crimes in the kingdom, including rape and violence against children.  © Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or or redistributelast_img read more

Elite Prospects Like Ben Simmons Almost Never Miss The Tournament

LSU’s Ben Simmons is a ludicrously versatile basketball prodigy whose freshman numbers already compare favorably with greats of the past. He’ll probably go first overall in this summer’s NBA draft, and deservedly so. But for all of Simmons’s brilliance, his Tigers aren’t very good — they rank 75th in Ken Pomeroy’s ratings, and at 18-12 they’re a long shot to make the NCAA Tournament.This pairing of an exceptional individual and an unremarkable team is pretty rare. When a team has a prospect as good as Simmons, it doesn’t usually lose before the second weekend of the tourney, much less miss the field entirely. To measure this, I gathered ESPN’s prospect rankings for collegiate players from 2001 through last season, tracking how far their teams went in the postseason during their final NCAA season. Among top-five prospects in that span — and Simmons ranks No. 1 this year — 87 percent were on teams that made the NCAA Tournament, with about half going as far as the Elite Eight before losing. The rest of the No. 1s went far — and I mean really far. Half went to the Final Four, and a third went to the national title game. They didn’t do it alone, though. Shane Battier, Anthony Davis and Greg Oden, for instance, generated almost exactly 25 percent of their teams’ win shares when they blazed a path to the championship game. Simmons has been a bit less productive than that trio on a per-minute basis, but he’s also generated 33 percent of LSU’s win shares this season, with his teammates creating roughly 45 percent fewer wins per game than those of Battier, Davis and Oden. If Simmons had anything close to their supporting casts, LSU probably wouldn’t be fretting about Selection Sunday.Instead, we’ll probably be left with a March Madness that doesn’t feature the nation’s best NBA prospect. That isn’t unprecedented, but it is pretty rare — and, mainly, it’s a bummer because Simmons is such an electrifying all-around talent in a sport that needs all the excitement it can get. The crew of prospects Simmons will join if LSU fails to make the tournament isn’t exactly bad — even Steph Curry ended his Davidson career in the NIT, after all. (Granted, Davidson in the Southern Conference and LSU in the Southeastern Conference are apples and oranges; perhaps a better comp for Simmons is Chris Bosh, who couldn’t elevate Georgia Tech into the tournament out of the ACC in 2002-03.) But the distribution of basketball talent is steep. Top draft picks are, on average, so much better than their peers that a No. 1-ranked prospect should probably be held to a higher standard than the rest of the top five.And, sure enough, in the 15 years before Simmons only one No. 1 prospect was on a team that missed the NCAA Tournament: Nerlens Noel, in 2012-13. The other 92 percent of No. 1s at least got to the round of 64, and even Noel’s case comes with a huge asterisk. Before Noel was lost for the season with a knee injury, his Kentucky team was on the bubble at 17-6, but improving; afterward, the Wildcats closed out the season 4-5 and stamped a nonrefundable ticket to the NIT. read more

San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore on fire season and elder abuse

first_imgSan Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore on fire season and elder abuse Posted: June 12, 2019 June 12, 2019 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – With temperatures heating up, it’s a good time to remind everyone to be prepared in the event of a wildfire.  Sheriff Bill Gore stopped by Good Morning San Diego to discuss what deputies do to protect the community from wildfires with evacuations, traffic control, how they work closely with fire agencies during fire incidents and encourage the public to register for emergency notifications from Alert San Diego.The Sheriff also talked about what the Sheriff’s Department does to protect senior citizens from becoming victims of crime.  Saturday, June 15th marks World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.The Sheriff’s Department also oversees the Take Me Home Program, a FREE service that gives law enforcement access to critical information about those enrolled who suffer from Alzheimer’s or any other developmental disabilities should they get lost.There is also the You Are Not Alone (YANA) Program. Sheriff’s Senior Volunteers visit homebound seniors several times a week to make sure they are okay. Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Amazons ISP dreams start with a crazy new satellite plan

first_img6:04 Now playing: Watch this: Jeff Bezos is giving Elon Musk a run for his money with… Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in front of a Blue Origin rocket. Blue Origin Amazon is in the early stages of an ambitious plan to create a 3,236-satellite project that would beam broadband internet access worldwide to millions of people.The company on Thursday confirmed the existence of the program, called Project Kuiper, which was first reported by GeekWire.”Project Kuiper is a new initiative to launch a constellation of Low Earth Orbit satellites that will provide low-latency, high-speed broadband connectivity to unserved and underserved communities around the world,” an Amazon spokesperson said Thursday. “This is a long-term project that envisions serving tens of millions of people who lack basic access to broadband internet. We look forward to partnering on this initiative with companies that share this common vision.”The project seems to follow Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ broad vision of developing more infrastructure in space, especially through his space travel and rocket company, Blue Origin. However, the spokesperson said Project Kuiper is an Amazon effort, not Blue Origin’s.In fact, Blue Origin, is already partnered with satellite operator Telesat on a separate effort to create a broadband internet satellite project. Blue Origin Amazon Space 9 Tags Project Kuiper is among a handful of big-concept efforts to expand internet access to more people. SpaceX, Elon Musk’s space travel company, is already developing Starlink, a similar project to create a satellite-based internet service that would also rely on thousands of low-orbit satellites. Facebook, too, is working on ways to bring internet access to millions of people through its Facebook Connectivity projects.The name Project Kuiper likely refers to Gerard Kuiper, an astronomer and the namesake of the Kuiper Belt, which is a collection of ice bodies past Neptune’s orbit.The effort likely shows that Amazon wants to avoid being left out of the race to be an internet service provider to many more people. It also illustrates that the e-commerce giant remains hungry to expand into new industries, after it already grew in cloud computing, TV production, robotics and delivery drones.The spokesperson declined to say who came up with the orbital ISP initiative or when it began, but noted that it’s still early days for the project and that it will take years for broadband service to become available.The project came to light after the Federal Communications Commission last week filed paperwork on Amazon’s behalf the International Telecommunication Union. Comments Sci-Tech Share your voicelast_img read more

2G and 3G Spectrum Auction Expected in February

first_imgThe department of telecom is likely to start the auction of 2G and 3G spectrum bands from February 2015.Proposed timeline for February’s auction:- 17 October ( Finalisation of new auctioneer)- 1 December (Notice for auction applications )- 8 December (Pre-bid conference)- January 12 ( Last date for bid submission)- January 28 (List of final bidders)- February (Auction starts)The government has projected ₹9355 crore as revenue receipts from 2G auctions in its budget estimates from current fiscal and is hopeful of raising a further ₹5000 crore through the sale of 3G airwaves.The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India is expected to direct the price of 900 and 1800 MHz spectrum by October.”We will write to Trai (Telecom Regulatory Authority of India) as soon as the swap comes through,” The Economic Times quoted an official.”On 800 MHz we will write to the regulator for some more clarity once the Telecom Commission has ratified the findings of the Dot (Department of Telecommunications) committee.”The Department of Telecommunication is scheduled to auction a total of 184 MHz of spectrum in the 900 MHz band presently owned by Idea Cellular and Vodafone, the permits for which are due to expire next November.The official also explained that in the previous auctions held in February, the government sold three fourths of the total airwaves available in the 1800 MHz band and the remaining one fourth would be put up for auction next year.There are about 29 licences that would expire across 18 circles in 2015-2016, reported Business Standard.last_img read more

PNB Housing Finance net profit rises 66 in FY16

first_imgPNB Housing Finance, a subsidiary of state-run Punjab National Bank, reported a rise in net profit, income and loans sanctioned for the financial year 2015-16. While net profit rose 66 percent to Rs. 326 crore, total income grew 52 percent to Rs. 2,697 crore, the company said in a statement on Thursday.The 28-year-old company disbursed loans worth Rs. 14,456 crore, 53 percent more as compared to the previous financial year.Assets under management rose 59 percent to Rs. 27,555 crore as on March 31, 2016, as against Rs. 17,297 crore in the previous financial year. Gross non-performing assets (NPAs) and net NPAs stood at 0.22 percent and 0.14 percent, respectively.PNB Housing Finance, in which Punjab National Bank holds 51 percent stake, declared a dividend of Rs. 3.4 per share. The company said the results were along expected lines.”The results are encouraging and at par with our expectations. With strong fundamentals of the Indian economy and a conducive environment for the mortgage industry, the velocity for the sector seems to be gaining and this shall provide huge impetus for PNB Housing to continue its growth momentum on an upward curve,” Sanjaya Gupta, managing director of PNB Housing Finance Limited, said in the statement.Another home loan company, Dewan Housing Finance Corporation Limited, had reported a 17.4 percent increase in net profit to Rs. 729.2 crore for the financial year 2015-16. Net interest income was Rs. 1,669 crore, up 21 percent from Rs. 1,379.80 in 2014-15. The company sanctioned loans worth Rs. 37,608 crore while assets under management rose 22 percent to Rs. 69,524 crore at the end of fiscal 2016, according to the company’s regulatory filing on May 4. Other prominent home loan companies in India include HDFC, LIC Housing Finance, Gruh Finance, and Repco, in addition to commercial banks, both state-run and private. RelatedState Bank of India cuts interest rates on home loansFirst-time home buyers to get additional tax benefit from April 2016Budget 2016: Removal of DDT tops wish-list of real estate firmslast_img read more

De Sousa Confirmation Moves Forward

first_imgBaltimore Police Commissioner Designate Darryl De Sousa took one step closer to officially taking perhaps the most challenging job in American law enforcement; commissioner of the beleaguered Baltimore Police Department (BPD).Baltimore Police Commissioner Designate, Darryl De Sousa was unanimously confirmed by the Baltimore City Council’s Executive Appointments Committee last night. A final vote before the full Council is scheduled for Feb. 26. (Courtesy photo)Wednesday night the Executive Appointments Committee of the Baltimore City Council voted unanimously for confirmation of De Sousa.Comments from the public and council members were generally supportive of the 30 year veteran of the BPD. However, the specter of unprecedented scandal within the department, including the death of Freddie Gray and the subsequent uprising of 2015, the release of the Department of Justice’s scathing report on the BPD in 2016, the disbanding of the notorious Gun Trace Task Force (GTTF) in 2017, and this week Baltimore being named, “the most dangerous city in the nation,” by USA Today, presents a prodigious challenge for De Sousa.“We already have everyone’s name that was implicated in the GTTF trials, all those names that came out, we physically have those folders…at police headquarters. I can say at least one of them right now, his police powers have been suspended he is not working the streets,” De Sousa said during the hearing.  “We’ll continue to look at each and every single case that we have.”Baltimore City Councilmen Kristerfer Burnett (D-8) and Zeke Cohen (D-1), both called De Sousa to task for suggesting the issues of misconduct and corruption within the BPD is the result of, “a few bad apples.” It was a statement De Sousa apologized for during the hearing.“I would like to go back to that Feb. 2nd statement and say that I should have…refrained from saying it as, “bad apples,” and I’m here to apologize for saying it that way,” De Sousa said. “But, what I’m saying here today is, are there bad or corrupt cops in the Baltimore City Police Department? Yes.”De Sousa faces a final confirmation vote by the full Council Feb. 26.last_img read more

Robot guards being tested in South Korea

first_img The robot, called Robo-Guard by many in the press, is equipped with several cameras, one of which is 3D, microphone, speaker and circuitry and software that allow it to roam autonomously in predefined areas within the prison. It also has software that allows it to analyze behavioral characteristics of inmates to help in deciding whether to alert the human guards. Its main purpose, according to the AFC, is to reduce manpower costs in prisons and to make a safer environment for both inmates and those that guard them.It also appears that the South Korean government, which has paid for the development of the robots, is using its prison population as a test ground for bolstering its robotics technology in general. After all, most, if not all of what these new robots do could just as easily be done by installing cameras in every hall and cell and connecting them to a computer that does the processing. But, because the testing is done in an environment where test subjects don’t have the option of objecting, research can be carried out that would not be possible in any other environment. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In addition to patrolling the halls, the robots are also able to serve as wireless two-way communications devices, allowing inmates and guards to communicate without the guard having to leave the command center. The human guards can also manually control the actions of the robots using an iPad application. The current test trial, which employs the use of three robots, is set to run for just one month and to cost a little over three quarters of a million dollars; at the end of which, researchers and politicians presumably will determine if the idea is feasible and whether the program ought to become permanent. If it does, the AFC has said they’d like to get the robots to one day perform body searches, though it’s not likely they would be capable of searching body cavities, instead they would perhaps be able to frisk inmates randomly, which likely would reduce the number of homemade weapons inmates use to harm one another or their guards. (Phys.org) — South Korea, a nation with a self-proclaimed goal of being a leader in robotics technology has, through the Asian Forum of Corrections (AFC), begun testing the feasibility of using robots as prison guards in an actual prison in Pohang. The robots’ duties, at least initially, are to patrol the halls between cells looking for signs of trouble, and if it finds it, alert the human guards who will take appropriate action.center_img © 2012 Phys.Org Robot guards to patrol South Korean prisons Citation: Robot guards being tested in South Korea (2012, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-robot-south-korea.htmllast_img read more